What to do at the Scene of an Accident

By: P. Christopher Guedri

You are driving along when you suddenly find yourself involved in a car or truck accident. What do you do? Remain calm, and follow these steps:

Stop! Any driver of a motor vehicle (car, truck, tractor trailer, or motor cycle) involved in an accident must stop immediately if (1) a person is injured or killed or (2) if an attended vehicle or other attended property is damaged.

But where should you stop? If you are physically able and your car is operable, stop as close to the scene of the accident as possible without obstructing traffic. If they are working, activate your emergency lights.

Call the police! You should call either the State police or the local law-enforcement agency to report… Read more

Trucking Log Books

By: P. Christopher Guedri

Falling asleep while barreling down the highway at 65 mph behind the wheel of a 26,000 pound truck can cause catastrophic injury or death. Since a fully loaded commercial truck can weigh over 25 times a passenger vehicle, trucking accidents are often much more severe than automobile accidents. Due to the discrepancy of size between a truck and a car, the most severe injuries usually occur to the occupants of the car. The Department of Transportation has placed strict regulations on truck driving to keep the truck drivers alert and safe. Log books are used to regulate the activities of truckers and help ensure that every trucker is well rested. The log book is used to track when a driver is driving, off duty,…

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Drowsy Driving

By: P. Christopher Guedri

Drowsy driving is a huge threat to safety on America’s roads. According to a AAA study, 41% of drivers admit to falling asleep at the wheel at some point, with 10% having done so in the pas year. And these are just the ones who actually fell asleep. More than 25% in drivers admit to driving while having difficulty staying awake within the last month.[1]

                Drowsy driving is particularly dangerous because it can be so difficult to recognize. In the early stages of fatigue, the driver may well be unaware that their response time is decreasing and their attention is wandering. However, there are early signs of drowsiness to watch out for. Drifting out of your lane, wandering and disconnected…

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Aggressive Driving

By: P. Christopher Guedri

Aggressive driving is a very broadly defined term encompassing many of the behaviors that lead to car accidents. The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety states that “any single unsafe driving behavior (deemed aggressive) can constitute aggressive driving provided the action was performed deliberately and with ill-intent.”[1] Aggressive driving can be caused by many things, including road work, lateness, and general stress, but at its core it always represents a loss of control and a disregard for safety behind the wheel.

                Aggressive driving is not just a minor threat. AAA estimates that more than half of all fatal auto accidents involve at least one behavior associated with aggressive…

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Driving Tips for Seniors

By: P. Christopher Guedri

As America’s population ages, seniors have begun to account for a larger percentage of the drivers on the roads. By the year 2020 America will have an estimated 37 million seniors, more than 90% of whom will be licensed to drive. However, the unavoidable fact is that driving relies heavily on skills and senses that tend to deteriorate with age, most notably vision and reaction time. Studies have indicated that a sixty-year-old driver requires as much as 10 times the amount of light to see as clearly as a nineteen-year-old does.[1]

            While it is true that seniors suffer from impaired vision and response time, the vast majority of elderly drivers are safe and responsible. As a group they tend…

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Pedestrian Safety

By: P. Christopher Guedri

In 2010 the number of people killed in automobile accidents dropped for the fifth year in a row. Yet even as America’s streets become safer, the number of pedestrian injuries and fatalities has increased every year. Pedestrian deaths now account for 13% of all traffic deaths, with 4,280 dying in 2010 alone. Only by understanding when and how pedestrian accidents happen can we reverse this trend and begin reducing pedestrian deaths along with general car accident deaths.[1]

                One method of reducing pedestrian accidents is to make people aware of particularly dangerous situations and how they can be avoided.   Thirty percent of all pedestrian accidents occur in the evening, half occur…

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Motorcycle Safety

By: P. Christopher Guedri

Motorcycles are a fun and daring way to experience America’s highways, but they are also much more dangerous than cars, due to their small size, the exposure of the rider, and their tendency to be driven at high speeds. More than 4,400 motorcyclists were killed in the United States in 2008, a fatality rate that far outstrips other methods of transportation. There are four primary factors governing motorcycle safety: visibility, equipment, training, and alcohol.[1]

                The safety of motorcycles on the road is inherently linked to their visibility. Motorcycles are both small and fast, a combination that makes them extremely difficult for drivers to see. Drivers and riders can both work to…

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Bicycle Safety

By: P. Christopher Guedri

Cycling is currently experiencing a massive surge in popularity, with more people than ever joining cycling groups, planning cycling trips, and cycling as part of their daily routine or commute. With many new cyclists on the road, cities are making an increased effort to accommodate bikes and their riders. But in many places, cyclists are still sharing cramped roads with motor vehicles, a dangerous state of affairs that requires a detailed knowledge of bicycle safety.

                The first thing to understand about bicycle safety is that bicycles are considered fully fledged vehicles when on the public roads, and as such have the same rights and responsibilities as cars. Cyclists have a right…

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